Friday, March 16, 2012

No spring, just a season of "disappointment"

Rain, rain go away - come again another day...

Earlier this week, the Seattle Times ran an article that exactly expressed thoughts that I hadn't really formed into words during my almost four years in this wet, northwest part of the country. In it, Chris Burke, a long time meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Seattle, talked about his definitions for the seasons, declaring the usual solstice- and equinox-relational connections completely obsolete in this area.

According to him, summer starts here first in July and lasts generously until August; then autumn spans over September and October, and winter lasts from November through February. But the oddest thing is that there is no such thing as spring, only a cold and wet, everlasting transitional period between February and July, which he generously dubs as the season of "disappointment".  

I'm more than ready to agree with him. As usual this time of the year, the heavens have been throwing on us hail, snow, rain mixed with hail and/or snow, or rain with drops so large that they could drown mice (unfortunately, they don't seem to have effect on the moles or voles that are messing up my lawn for the moment). I come from Finland with a climate so much colder than this, but I don't mind cold as long as it is dry, preferably with snow covering the ground. What I really dislike is this perpetual wetness; some days I'm sure I'm starting to grow gills, or at least small webs between my toes. 

When discreetly complain about the weather to the locals, they look at me as if I was mad, asking me what I did expect. I don't like them doing that. But then, by now I should have learned my lesson and not to expect a real spring, but a season of - disappointment. 

6 comments:

Tatyana@MySecretGarden said...

I am sorry that you feel this way. I've lived here, in the Pacific Northwest, since 2003. Yes, it rains a lot. But, I have hundreds of winter and spring photographs in my Photo-file showing blue sky and bright sun. March is a transitional month, but even now, there are dozens of plants which show their fresh green and red tops! It's certainly spring! I lived in Russia for many years and used to four distinctive seasons. Here, they are not so distinctive. But, it's better than, let's say, Arizona with its two seasons.
Anyway, I am also looking for some warmth and sun. All the best to you and your garden!

The Intercontinental Gardener said...

Thanks, Tatyana - I am quite grumpy for the moment, just can't take the rain for the moment. Even if the sun comes out occasionally, everything is so wet, damp, soaked that even Arizona sounds nice for me (even if I really would miss my snowdrops in that climate). Oh well, nothing to do but to bear this until the weather changes. All the best, Liisa.

Richard said...

Last couple years, March has been drearier than in the past. I blame it on that La Nina weather condition.

I often think I can make my life better this time of year by escaping to a sunny place for a for a few days. Wrong! It only seems worse when you get back.

The Intercontinental Gardener said...

Richard - so it might be my short Mexican sojourn that makes me so grumpy? Oh, I would go back, any second, when it's this wet...

Titania said...

Here too, rain and more rain, but at least it is warm; I only have to think of spring and the dry, dry spells we can have, when the garden gasps for water and the plants have not a happy look...at least with all this rain it is green and lush and weeds grow like there is no tomorrow.

The Intercontinental Gardener said...

Hello Titania, good to hear from you! It is great that the drought has broken, but sorry that some areas there get all too much rain now. My 'problems' with the rain here are really only at the whinging level... And yes, weeds do grow like there's no tomorrow, here too!